OVERVIEW

Whether running on oilfield gas direct from the ground or on transported liquid natural gas, our engines and turbines can be found offshore and in the remote corners of the world powering operations upstream, midstream, and downstream.

upstream

Upstream

Today natural gas accounts for 23 percent of the world’s energy consumption and usage is growing. Getting this abundant, environmentally friendly fuel into the global energy stream requires compressing it for efficient handling. Engine-driven compressors compress gas at the wellhead, gather gas from multiple wells, and send it to processing facilities.

How it Works: Gas Gathering/Wellhead

At the wellhead, engine-driven compressors manage the flow of gas from the well and into the pipeline.

With a higher-pressure well, the pressure works with the suction function of the compressor to aid the compression process.

At low well pressures, the compressor draws gas from the well into the compressor. The compressor boosts gas pressure to a level slightly above pipeline pressure so gas flows into the pipeline.

Gas gathered from multiple wells is compressed by engine-driven compressors and sent through a central pipeline to a designated location.

In coal seam and unconventional gas evacuation, the compressor, operating at very low suction pressure, extracts gas from a coal zone for processing and sale, or to make the area safe for mining.

For wellhead and gas-gathering applications, a dependable engine-driven compression system that operates efficiently is essential to keeping the gas moving and productivity and profitability high.

GE’s portfolio of aeroderivative gas turbines and Waukesha gas engines for compression applications offers multiple options to address individual site conditions and widely varying local emissions requirements.

How it works: Injection

GE’s aeroderivative gas turbines and Waukesha gas engines are widely used to drive compressors at production sites. They typically run on raw gas taken directly from the well head. For gas lift, the compressor injects gas into an oil well casing where it passes through lift valves at various elevations causing oil to be lifted out of the well. For gas injection, the compressor injects gas into an oil formation to increase pressure and force more oil and gas out though through the well pipe.

At gas production sites, a dependable engine or turbine-driven compression system that operates efficiently is essential to keeping the gas flowing and productivity and profitability high.

Features & Benefits

Durable 

  • Running on raw gas from the wellhead, GE's Waukesha gas engines and aeroderivative gas turbines perform with extreme reliability in remote and often harsh environments.

Fuel tolerance

  • Waukesha gas engines can handle significant variations in field gas quality and keep on running. More uptime means more profit.

Greater productivity

  • Waukesha gas engines run at full power at higher altitudes and higher ambient temperatures, compressing more gas for more profit.

Emissions flexibility

  • GE offers technology options to meet most local air quality mandates.

Lower emissions per horsepower

  • Rich-burn Waukesha gas engines with 3-way-catalyst enable more horsepower per site for more productivity and profit.

Total engine control

  • GE's Waukesha ESM fully integrated control and diagostics system optimizes engine performance and maximises uptime.
midstream

Midstream

GE’s Waukesha gas engines excel at keeping gas moving through the midstream portion of the oil and gas production process.

How It works

Gas transmission pipelines are hundreds of miles long and as gas moves through a pipeline, the pressure in the line drops, which slows the flow of gas. To boost line pressure and keep the gas moving, gas engine or gas turbine-driven compressors are stationed at various points along the pipeline.

In areas where electricity is not readily available or is unreliable, a dependable engine-driven compressor system is essential to keeping the gas moving.

Engine or turbine-driven compressors operating on the same gas they compress are a cost-effective alternative to compressors powered by electricity. A more efficient engine/turbine—one that compresses more gas while using less fuel—improves operational productivity and profitability.

 

Features & Benefits

Durable

  • GE’s Waukesha gas engines and aeroderivative gas turbines perform with extreme reliability in remote and often harsh environments.

Greater productivity

  • Waukesha engines run at full power at higher altitudes and higher ambient temperatures, compressing more gas for more profit.

Emissions flexibility

  • GE offers technology options to meet most local air quality mandates.

Lower emissions per horsepower

  • Rich-burn Waukesha gas engines with a three-way catalyst enable more horsepower-per-site for more productivity and profit.

Total engine control

  • GE's Waukesha ESM fully integrated control and diagnostics system optimizes engine performance and maximises uptime.
midstream

Storage

In colder climates, natural gas consumption fluctuates with the seasons, but natural gas production is a continuous, year-round process. Gas produced during times of low demand is bought more cheaply by gas companies and stored for later use when consumption levels—and prices—rise. Compressors, such as those driven by GE’s aeroderivative gas turbines and Waukesha gas engines, are integral to the storage and retrieval process. 

How It works

During warm weather when demand is low, gas is stored in underground formations, such as depleted reservoirs or salt cavities. Gas engine or gas turbine-driven compressors force the gas into the storage cavities. Later, when demand rises with the onset of colder weather, compressors recover the gas fro, the storage site. 

In areas where electricity is not readily available or is unreliable, a dependable engine or turbine-driven compressor system is essential to keeping the storage and retrieval process operating. 

Gas engine or gas turbine-driven compressors operating on the same gas they compress are a cost- effective alternative to compressors powered by electricity. Additionally, they can help to reduce overall energy costs by reducing electricity use during peak demand times. 

A more efficient engine/turbine—one that compresses more gas while using less fuel—improves operational productivity and profitability. 

Features & Benefits

Durable

  • GE’s Waukesha gas engines and aeroderivative gas turbines perform with extreme reliability in remote and often harsh environments.

Greater productivity

  • Waukesha engines run at full power at higher altitudes and higher ambient temperatures, compressing more gas for more profit.

Reduced costs

  • Gas engines can reduce operating costs significantly compared to electric motor-driven compressors by reducing peak demand charges. 

Emissions flexibility

  • GE offers technology options to meet most local air quality mandates.

Lower emissions per horsepower

  • Rich-burn Waukesha gas engines with a three-way catalyst enable more horsepower-per-site for more productivity and profit.

Total engine control

  • GE's Waukesha ESM fully integrated control and diagnostics system optimizes engine performance and maximises uptime.
karamyfield

Downstream/Processing

Raw natural gas undergoes multi-stage processing before it is a marketable natural gas fuel.

Features & Benefits

Durable

  • GE’s Waukesha gas engines and aeroderivative gas turbines perform with extreme reliability in remote and often harsh environments.

Fuel tolerance 

  • Waukesha gas engines can handle significant variations in field gas quality and keep on running. More uptime means more profit.

Greater productivity

  • Waukesha engines run at full power at higher altitudes and higher ambient temperatures, compressing more gas for more profit.

Emissions flexibility 

  • GE offers technology options to meet most local air quality mandates.

Lower emissions per horsepower

  • Rich-burn Waukesha gas engines with a three-way catalyst enable more horsepower-per-site for more productivity and profit.

Total engine control

  • GE's Waukesha ESM fully integrated control and diagnostics system optimizes engine performance and maximises uptime.
oilfield-power-gen

Oilfield Power Generation

Because oilfield operations often unlock plentiful natural gas supplies, GE offers power generation solutions that put that low cost fuel to use to help power oil and gas production sites across the globe. Backed by more than a century of innovation and engine-building experience, GE’s Waukesha and Jenbacher gas engines are ideally suited to deliver reliable and efficient performance for a variety of mobile and stationary applications—whether running on oilfield gas pulled straight from the ground, trucked-in liquid natural gas (LNG) or compressed natural gas (CNG).

How It Works

The field gas that is uncovered as the result of oil extraction is often wastefully flared or captured at significant expense. GE’s fuel-flexible gas engines offer an alternative solution that turns the field gas directly into power for applications such as drill rigs, artificial lifts, pump-jacks, and worker camps.

Rich-burn technology: Ideal for use in the most rugged environments, GE’s Waukesha EPA-certified gas engines employ a rich-burn combustion technology for precise control of the air-fuel ratio at stoichiometric conditions.

Low emissions: With the help of a three-way catalyst, rich burn engines can achieve very low exhaust gas emissions (such as NOx, CO, and THC) compared to lean burn engines.

Proven reliability: Rich-burn engines offer the same reliable, continuous performance proven in gas compression applications for a variety of field environments, including: hot fuel applications, greater than 50 percent load step capability, and extended service intervals.

High-altitude performance: While turbocharged diesel engines typically require derating above 1,500 feet (457 m), rich-burn technology offers increased flexibility with full power at altitudes up to 8,000 feet (2,438 m).

Fuel flexibility: Because rich-burn engines operate with a wide knock and misfire margin, they will run at higher loads on a variety of lower quality fuels.

Lean-burn technology: For drill rig applications running LNG, GE’s Jenbacher EPA-certified gas engines offer high-efficiency lean-burn control that is particularly well-suited to mobile oilfield applications.

Features & Benefits

Rugged, durable operation

  • Ideally suited for reliable operation in harsh, remote, mobile or stationary mission-critical applications.

“Plug and Play” installation 

  • Easily exchanged with existing diesel rig power generation drivers.

Reduced operational costs

  • Field gas operation cuts operational costs by up to 80 percent compared to diesel or dual-fuel operation.

Fuel flexibility 

  • Ability to operate on a wide range of gas fuel quality, including high-BTU field gas (up to 1654 BTU HHV), HD-5 propane, and ethane, without knock.

Lower emissions 

  • Paired with a three-way catalyst, rich-burn engines can attain or surpass the latest environmental requirements, producing emissions as much as 95 percent lower than diesel operation.

High-altitude performance

  • Maintains performance ratings at much higher altitudes (up to 8,000 feet) – without derate – compared to diesel technology.
  • Excellent transient load capability, Rich-burn engines handle large load variations in just two steps (nearly as well as diesel engines).
Want to Learn More? 

Oil and Gas Solutions

Backed by more than a century of experience and innovation, GE’s gas engines and gas turbines provide more reliable, efficient, environmentally friendlier power generation in the full range of mobile and stationary applications.